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Sabriya Rice

Reporter/Chicago

Sabriya Rice reports on quality of care and patient-safety issues. Rice previously wrote and produced for the medical unit of CNN, where she contributed to the Empowered Patient column and the weekly medical program formerly called “Housecall with Dr. Sanjay Gupta.” She earned a bachelor's degree in film and television from the University of Notre Dame and a master's in communication studies from the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. She joined Modern Healthcare in 2014.

Presence Health rethinks its Lean initiative


September 02, 2016

Just six months after taking over the head office at Presence Health system, CEO Michael Englehart is rethinking being "Lean." The Chicago-based system's 11 hospitals had been practicing a manufacturing industry management style known as Lean. The goal was to address challenges to delivering high-value care.

DaVita, Northwell Health partner on kidney-care services


May 19, 2016

The healthcare providers will merge resources for transplant and inpatient services, physician education and clinical research in the New York City area. They will also open a free-standing dialysis center where nurses will instruct patients on using in-home dialysis equipment.

Blog: Patients using alternative treatments more likely to delay chemo


May 12, 2016

Not all women initiate recommended breast cancer treatment despite the survival benefits associated with it. A new study in JAMA Oncology suggests their delays in treatment might, in part, be related to whether or not they use complementary and alternative medicines.

Blog: Prescribing generic drugs could have saved $73 billion


May 09, 2016

The nation could have saved an estimated $73 billion from 2010 to 2012 if clinicians had more frequently prescribed alternatives to brand-name drugs, according to a new study. The total out-of pocket savings for patients would have been about $25 billion.

Breast cancer screening guidelines spark a racial divide


May 07, 2016

Some health and civil-rights advocates say guidelines that recommend women postpone breast cancer screenings until they are age 50 should not apply to black women, who are more likely to die if they contract the disease.

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