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Virginia governor signs bills aimed at stemming opioid epidemic

By Aurora Aguilar  |  February 25, 2017

Facing a growing opioid epidemic, Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe has signed bills that allow community organizations to dispense naloxone, an overdose-reversal drug and another measure that mandates all opioids be electronically prescribed by 2020.

Canceled CDC climate change conference revived, addresses public health concerns

By Steven Ross Johnson  |  February 16, 2017

A climate change conference canceled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over concerns it ran counter to positions held by the Trump administration took place with a different sponsor: Al Gore. The forum focused on how a rise in global temperatures is affecting people's health.

Data Points: Climate change and health

Data Points: Climate change and health

By Modern Healthcare  |  February 11, 2017

Average global temperatures rose to new heights in 2016 with the U.S. recording its second-hottest year ever. Rising temperatures are having a major impact on public health.

Data Points: Cancer's toll by race and geography

Data Points: Cancer's toll by race and geography

By Modern Healthcare  |  January 28, 2017

The U.S. cancer mortality rate, in steady decline for over three decades, still takes a higher toll on African Americans. Regional disparities persist, too, with some areas of the country seeing worsening cancer mortality rates.

Where you live could be a matter of life or death if you get cancer

By Steven Ross Johnson  |  January 24, 2017

Cancer deaths have declined in the U.S. over the past three decades, but mortality rates can vary greatly depending on the county where you live. Researchers say that information could better inform treatment and prevention efforts in certain communities.

Data Points: Covering the already sick

Data Points: Covering the already sick

By Modern Healthcare  |  January 14, 2017

There is bipartisan support for the Affordable Care Act's prohibiting insurers from denying coverage or charging higher rates to people with pre-existing medical conditions. Repealing the law without a replacement could impact roughly half of non-elderly Americans.

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