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Google's sister company sets out to bug mosquitoes

Google's sister company sets out to bug mosquitoes

By Modern Healthcare  |  July 31, 2017

In a bid to decrease the skeeter population in Fresno County, Calif., Verily this month began releasing 1 million male mosquitos every week for 20 weeks. But don't bug out, it's less itchy than it sounds.

CDC and states lack resources to combat Zika

By Steven Ross Johnson  |  May 24, 2017

Agencies responsible for running tests to identify Zika don't have the right equipment to do so and there aren't enough coordinated efforts to control the mosquito population, according to a new federal analysis released Tuesday.

The 2016 Year in Review: Public health

The 2016 Year in Review: Public health

By Steven Ross Johnson  |  December 17, 2016

The sheer scope of the opioid crisis—as well as the geographic and demographic changes in the kinds of people affected—propelled a landmark policy shift toward treating addiction as an illness rather than a crime.

Timing is everything to this mosquito researcher

Timing is everything to this mosquito researcher

By Modern Healthcare  |  November 12, 2016

For Steven Juliano, it's not how you kill disease-carrying mosquitoes. It's when. “I don't do mosquito control,” said the distinguished professor of ecology at Illinois State University. “I provide the information on where they're vulnerable.”

Zika mobile app finds mosquito breeding locations

Zika mobile app finds mosquito breeding locations

By Joseph Conn  |  October 31, 2016

A new mobile app developed by a couple of professors at Texas A&M University enables public-health workers and crowdsourced “citizen scientists” to send geocoded reports of potential breeding locations for the type of mosquito that carries the Zika virus.

Hurricane could pose additional challenge in fight against Zika

Hurricane could pose additional challenge in fight against Zika

By Steven Ross Johnson  |  October 10, 2016

Standing bodies of water are breeding grounds for mosquitoes and some remote, very vulnerable areas could be inaccessible for weeks because of road closures and clean-up efforts focused on more immediate public health concerns. After Hurricane Katrina, the number of West Nile cases spiked.

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