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Does snake venom hold the key to curing cancer?

Does snake venom hold the key to curing cancer?

By Modern Healthcare  |  September 29, 2018

A University of Northern Colorado researcher is studying whether snake venom, with toxins that bind very specifically to the receptors in a reptile's prey, can help target cancer cells.

WeWork to open collaboration spaces for cancer research

WeWork to open collaboration spaces for cancer research

By Jonathan LaMantia  |  September 24, 2018

The fast-growing coworking startup said that it will create "collaboration hubs" in Manhattan, Boston and San Francisco that will include office space. The goal is to encourage information-sharing that could lead to better treatments.

Community providers form independent cancer care network

Community providers form independent cancer care network

By Alex Kacik  |  September 12, 2018

Tennessee Oncology, New York Cancer & Blood Specialists and West Cancer Center combined their 225 cancer physicians, 60 locations and 158,000 patients to create Nashville-based OneOncology.

Data Points: Beware of skin cancer during the dog days of summer

Data Points: Beware of skin cancer during the dog days of summer

By Modern Healthcare  |  July 14, 2018

The dog days of summer have arrived—running from July 3 to Aug. 11, according to the Old Farmer's Almanac. The 40-day stretch typically coincides with the hottest days of the year. Perfect for sitting by the pool, lake or ocean. But don't forget that sunscreen, or better yet, head-to-toe...

Cancer society recommends earlier colon, rectal screenings

Cancer society recommends earlier colon, rectal screenings

By Steven Ross Johnson  |  May 30, 2018

The American Cancer Society recommended that individuals begin colorectal cancer screening at age 45, five years earlier than previous guidelines. The change reflects a rise in colon and rectal cancer cases and deaths among adults under 50.

Shorter breast cancer treatment could hurt providers' bottom line

Shorter breast cancer treatment could hurt providers' bottom line

By Alex Kacik  |  May 17, 2018

Women who use the breast cancer drug Herceptin for six months did just as well as those who took it for a year, according to a new study that could ultimately benefit value-based providers and harm those still based on fee-for-service models.

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