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EHRs do not lower administrative billing costs, study finds

EHRs do not lower administrative billing costs, study finds

By Rachel Z. Arndt  |  February 20, 2018

Electronic health records were supposed to lower administrative costs, but they may not be getting the job done, according to the study. Administrators and clinicians sometimes spend more than an hour on billing and insurance activities for a single visit.

Prime Healthcare's medical school receives preliminary accreditation

Prime Healthcare's medical school receives preliminary accreditation

By Maria Castellucci  |  February 20, 2018

California University of Science and Medicine's School of Medicine is expected to open in August. Prime Healthcare Foundation, the not-for-profit affiliate of for-profit health system Prime Healthcare Services, provided more than $60 million for establishment of the medical school.

Physicians decry consequences of consolidation

Physicians decry consequences of consolidation

By Alex Kacik  |  February 20, 2018

The decline of the independent medical practice and lack of physician-owned hospitals caused by consolidation have negative implications for continuity of patient care, quality, innovation and cost, the Physicians Advocacy Institute warned Congress.

Mayo Clinic CEO Noseworthy to retire

Mayo Clinic CEO Noseworthy to retire

By Alex Kacik  |  February 20, 2018

Mayo Clinic President and CEO Dr. John Noseworthy will retire at year's end after nearly a decade leading the Rochester, Minn.-based health system.

Modern Healthcare is at HIMSS18

By Modern Healthcare  |  February 20, 2018

Visit Modern Healthcare at HIMSS18 Booth 6226 for the chance to speak face-to-face with our Publisher, Fawn Lopez, and Editor, Aurora Aguilar. Don't miss this unique opportunity to join in the conversation and discover the latest Modern Healthcare has to offer.

What it costs hospitals to reverse an opioid overdose

What it costs hospitals to reverse an opioid overdose

By Kristen Schorsch  |  February 20, 2018

Some patients who overdose are revived quickly with a reversal drug like naloxone. But depending on how fast they reach the hospital, and what kind of opioid they took, others may be put on a ventilator. They can wind up in the hospital for days, perhaps weeks.

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