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Epic, Cerner are top EHRs for docs meeting meaningful-use requirement


By Joseph Conn
Posted: May 5, 2014 - 12:45 pm ET
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Epic Systems Corp. is the top vendor of complete electronic health-record systems used by physicians and other professionals who earned Medicare incentive payments for using the technology, according to federal data. Cerner Corp. leads the pack among the smaller number of physicians who use modular EHR systems.

Privately held Epic, based in Verona, Wis., ranks No. 1 among developers of complete EHRs used by physicians and other eligible professionals in an ambulatory-are setting to meet the meaningful-use requirement of the Medicare portion of the program created under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, according to a mashup of databases from the CMS and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology at HHS.

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Epic tops 486 developers in that market niche with 98,770 payments to providers who used its EHR system to attest to meeting their Stage 1 Medicare meaningful-use requirements. The payments in that category to Epic's customers reflect 22.1% of the total. Allscripts placed No. 2, with 48,074 payments (10.8%) followed eClinicalWorks with 31,959 (7.2%), NextGen Healthcare with 29,222 (6.6%) and GE Healthcare with 23,715 (5.3%.)

Publicly traded Cerner, Kansas City, Mo., ranks No. 1 among developers of modular EHRs used by physicians and other EPs in ambulatory care. Cerner leads among 113 developers of these modular systems with 32,148 user attestations and payments, totaling 41.8% of the payments in this category. Allscripts placed second in this category, too, with 11,412 payments (14.8%), followed Intermountain Healthcare with 6,028 (7.8%), Allscripts subsidiary Jardogs with 4,494 (5.8%) and GE Healthcare with 3,809 (4.9%). The top five vendors racked up 75.2% of the meaningful-users attestations and payments in this category.

Through March, the Medicare, Medicaid and Medicare Advantage versions of the EHR incentive payment program have paid out $22.9 billion since payments began in January 2011, including nearly $8.6 billion paid to physicians and other EPs. About $5.5 billion was paid through Medicare, $2.8 billion through Medicaid, and almost $316 million through Medicare Advantage programs. The remaining $14.3 billion has been paid to hospitals.

Follow Joseph Conn on Twitter: @MHJConn


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