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Working with the rules

Data tagging allows selective sharing with EHRs


By Joseph Conn
Posted: September 22, 2012 - 12:01 am ET
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“We're trying to provide patients some ability to control what information is shared and make it easy on them.”

—Mike Davis, VA project lead

Using off-the-shelf content standards and messaging protocols, the Veterans Affairs Department and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration of HHS have successfully demonstrated how to electronically tag mental health and other highly sensitive clinical records to help providers comply with stringent state and federal privacy laws limiting the sharing of those records without patient consent.

Development of the electronic patient-consent management system came in response to the VA's and SAMHSA's own needs to protect the privacy of patients under two federal medical record privacy laws that are more robust than the privacy rule under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

The demo was part of a Data Segmentation for Privacy Initiative by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology at HHS. It also answers a 2010 call by the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology to use metadata tagging to enhance privacy while making medical data more readily available for research. A metadata tag provides information about the underlying data.

Tagging a patient's record at the “granular” or data-element level enables patients to give consent to the exchange of some parts of their medical record—such as a diagnosis code for diabetes and a drug prescription for its treatment—but not other parts, such as the diagnosis of a sexually transmitted disease or a mental health counseling session.

“The bottom line is we're trying to provide patients some ability to control what information is shared and make it easy on them,” said Mike Davis, VA project lead and Veterans Health Administration security architect.

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Federal law applying specifically to the VA requires that, under typical circumstances, the VA must obtain a veteran's consent before his or her medical records can be shared outside the organization. The VA also abides by another federal law that bars federally funded alcohol and drug treatment providers from sharing information about such treatment without patient consent. The latter law creates a consent requirement that sticks to and flows with the data, so that each subsequent provider to receive it also must obtain patient consent to disclose it elsewhere.

Privacy laws in several states also contain these sticky provisions, said Joy Pritts, chief privacy officer at ONC, who attended the demo in Baltimore this month during a conference sponsored by Health Level 7. The healthcare standards development organization has produced a classification and coding system to identify and constrain particularly sensitive information; the system was used by the VA and SAMHSA in the demo, as were the ONC's Direct messaging protocols.

In the demonstration, a care summary was exchanged between providers for a patient enrolled in an alcohol and drug abuse treatment program. The VA/SAMHSA system tagged discrete elements of the record “do not re-disclose.”

One missing piece in the automated privacy protection scheme, however, is how to deal with dictated notes containing sensitive patient data. A text document could be constrained by tagging the entire document, Davis said, but that would need to be done by hand, whereas tagging of discrete data can be done by the system, which can sit as a layer between one provider's EHR and another's.

Patients can specify their wishes with computerized consent directives created online at home or on a provider's computer system, he said.

Davis said there is no timeline for rolling out these functions across the VA, but the VA has several pilot sites running where the system is in daily use recording a veteran's simple “yes/no” electronic consent directives for exchange of their records with outside providers.

Pritts said ONC has two additional pilots planned, one with the VA and one with private-sector providers.

“I think this can work for what's called structure data—medications in the medication list, allergies in the allergies list, diagnostic codes in the problem list, lab test results, vital signs—that type of information,” said Daniel Gottlieb, a partner in the Chicago office of McDermott Will & Emery who heads the firm's health information technology and data protection practice.

With the EHR systems used by providers today, “typically the technology doesn't have the capability” to segregate those drugs on a medication list for a common ailment from those drugs to treat another, more sensitive one, such as a psychiatric condition, Gottlieb said.

“That leaves you with two options in the real world,” he said. “One is not to make that medication list available” outside the organization. “Or, you can take the position that providing high-quality care” is the greater good, “and just decide that you're going to accept that legal risk.”

Gottlieb said many providers lean toward the latter, for instance if a patient is taking medication for a psychiatric disorder but also for a chronic condition such as diabetes. “There could be the potential for the adverse reaction between the psychiatric drug and some other drug,” prescribed either in the same hospital or by another provider. “I think most people think avoiding that reaction takes precedent over the privacy concern.”


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